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Your Thoughts

June 16, 2021

Did you know that it is estimated that the average person has about 60,000 thoughts a day?

I wish I had known this when I used to lay awake at night unable to turn off my brain. I was a relentless Over-thinker. Over-worrier. Over-analyzer. 

60,000 thoughts is a lot of junk to sift through every day. 

The question is how many of our thoughts are actually productive? Or maybe the better question is how many of our thoughts are counter-productive? 

Do you ever find yourself stuck on negative thought loops?

You play the same thought over and over again. Focusing on the worst possible outcome. Something that has not happened. Something that may never happen. And yet, you just can’t seem to shake the thinking spiral. 

It wasn’t until I developed a daily meditation practice that I learned to not indulge every negative thought… at least for 15 MINUTES a day while I was meditating. 

But, it wasn’t until I became a life coach that I learned how to manage those pesky thoughts during the other 15 HOURS of the day. 

Negative thoughts are like unruly pets, they need structure and loving guidance. 

Negative thoughts can undermine your sense of well-being and prevent you from reaching your goals. Or even if you do reach your goals, you are too exhausted and burned out to enjoy them.

When we are able to stop indulging in negative thought loops, our brains are free to focus on things that create productivity, happiness, and more of what you want in your life: Money, Love, Time, etc.

Developing the skill to managing your thoughts is like developing a superpower. It helps you reduce your stress, anxiety and improves the quality of your life. 

It all starts with our thoughts because… 

“What We Think, We Become.”– Buddha

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